John 12:16-19

At first his disciples did not understand all this. Only after Jesus was glorified did they realize that these things had been written about him and that these things had been done to him.
Now the crowd that was with him when he called Lazarus from the tomb and raised him from the dead continued to spread the word. Many people, because they had heard that he had performed this sign, went out to meet him. So the Pharisees said to one another, “See, this is getting us nowhere. Look how the whole world has gone after him!”

The disciples' initial lack of understanding highlights an important truth about discipleship. It's not always about immediate comprehension but about a journey of faith and realization. This can serve as a comforting reminder that even those closest to Jesus didn't always grasp his mission right away. It underscores the dynamic nature of faith, where understanding often unfolds retrospectively.

The reference to the miracle of Lazarus' resurrection is also important. It shows how Jesus’ miracles were not just acts of compassion but also powerful tools for revealing his identity and purpose. This miracle, in particular, catalyzed public recognition of Jesus, fulfilling prophecies about him.

The disciples' eventual realization that Jesus' life was a fulfillment of Scripture invites us to see the Bible as a unified narrative converging on Jesus. This realization enriches our reading of both the Old and New Testaments, revealing them as parts of a unified narrative converging on Jesus. Approaching it from this perspective will make it an extremely enlightening and interesting read!

The Pharisees' frustration ("Look how the whole world has gone after him!") underscores the social and political threat Jesus posed. His popularity wasn't just a religious concern but also a challenge to the established order. This aspect can inspire a re-evaluation of how Jesus' message challenges societal structures even today.

Finally, this passage, especially in its reference to Jesus being 'glorified,' invites us to contemplate on the mystery of Jesus being fully human and fully divine. It opens up a space for exploring the paradoxes inherent in the Christian understanding of Jesus. Exploring these paradoxes is challenging, yet it is an integral part of our journey in faith.

God bless you.

More in this category: « John 12:12-15 John 12:20-26 »
The Bite-Sized Gospel with Aneel Aranha — Matthew 12:1-8
The Bite-Sized Gospel with Aneel Aranha — Matthew 12:1-8
Read and reflect on the gospels with Aneel Aranha — one little bite at a time. To receive these via WhatsApp, please message "subscribe" to +91 93214 56817. For other great resources by Aneel Aranha, visit https://aneelaranha.com/
The Bite-Sized Gospel with Aneel Aranha — Matthew 11:28-30
The Bite-Sized Gospel with Aneel Aranha — Matthew 11:28-30
Read and reflect on the gospels with Aneel Aranha — one little bite at a time. To receive these via WhatsApp, please message "subscribe" to +91 93214 56817. For other great resources by Aneel Aranha, visit https://aneelaranha.com/
The Bite-Sized Gospel with Aneel Aranha — Matthew 11:27
The Bite-Sized Gospel with Aneel Aranha — Matthew 11:27
Read and reflect on the gospels with Aneel Aranha — one little bite at a time. To receive these via WhatsApp, please message "subscribe" to +91 93214 56817. For other great resources by Aneel Aranha, visit https://aneelaranha.com/
The Bite-Sized Gospel with Aneel Aranha — Matthew 11:25-26
The Bite-Sized Gospel with Aneel Aranha — Matthew 11:25-26
Read and reflect on the gospels with Aneel Aranha — one little bite at a time. To receive these via WhatsApp, please message "subscribe" to +91 93214 56817. For other great resources by Aneel Aranha, visit https://aneelaranha.com/

Load More